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U.S. News Headlines - Yahoo! News

Ohio shooting stokes debate over U.S. campus police forces

An impromptu memorial for Samuel Dubose is posted near the crime scene in Cincinnati OhioFor all that was shocking about a university police officer shooting a man at point blank range during a routine traffic stop near the University of Cincinnati campus this month, one thing was not. It is just one of the many powers held by the majority of campus police forces that have become a daily part of university life in the United States but this month came under unprecedented scrutiny. Ranks have grown since campus policing began in earnest amid civil unrest in the late 1960s, as have resources, helping campus police departments become the well-equipped, career-based force they are today.



Two Ohio campus police officers won't face charges: prosecutor

Body cam video shows University of Cincinnati police officers Ray Tensing and Phillip Kidd approaching Dubose vehicle in CincinnatiTwo University of Cincinnati police officers who were interviewed about the death of an unarmed black motorist at the hands of a fellow officer will not face charges, a prosecutor said on Friday. Raymond Tensing, 25, a former University of Cincinnati police officer, has been charged with murder in the shooting death of Samuel DuBose, 43, whom he stopped for a missing license plate. The two other University of Cincinnati officers, Phillip Kidd and David Lindenschmidt, were placed on administrative leave on Thursday.



'Temporary' not guilty plea entered for Charleston suspect

Dylann Storm Roof appears by closed-circuit television at his bond hearing in CharlestonBy Harriet McLeod CHARLESTON, S.C. (Reuters) - A federal magistrate on Friday entered a "temporary" not guilty plea for Dylann Roof on hate crime charges in the slaying of nine African-Americans at a South Carolina church, even as his lawyer said his client wanted to plead guilty. The lead defense attorney, David Bruck, said he could not advise Roof, 21, to declare his guilt in the massacre until after prosecutors said whether they would seek capital punishment. "Roof has told us he wishes to plead guilty," Bruck told the court.



U.S. Marines declare initial F-35 squadron ready for combat

Two U.S. Marine F-35B Lightning II Joint Strike Fighters complete vertical landings aboard the USS Wasp during operational testingU.S. Marine Corps Commandant General Joseph Dunford has declared an initial squadron of 10 Lockheed Martin Corp F-35B fighter jets ready for combat, marking a key milestone for the Pentagon's biggest weapons program, the Pentagon said on Friday. The decision makes the Marines the first U.S. military service to declare an "initial operational capability" for the stealth supersonic F-35 fighter under the $391 billion arms program that first kicked off in 2001. Lockheed is developing three models of the jet, also known as the Joint Strike Fighter, or Lightning II.



Injured nurses file lawsuit over Colorado helicopter crash

Two Colorado flight nurses critically injured in the fiery crash of a medical transport helicopter that killed the pilot earlier this month sued the aircraft's manufacturer and operator on Friday, court records showed. David Repsher, 45, and Matthew Bowe, 32, were injured on July 3 when the Flight For Life helicopter they were aboard crashed on take-off from the St. Anthony Summit Medical Center in Frisco, a mountain town about 70 miles west of Denver. The pilot, Patrick Mahany, was killed in the crash.


Employee dorm fire kills 1, injures 4 in Grand Teton

MOOSE, Wyo. (AP) ? A fire at an employee dormitory in Grand Teton National Park killed one person and injured four others in the third emergency for national park concession workers in Wyoming in the past two months.


Some Alaska Natives allowed visa-free travel to Russian area

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) ? Some western Alaska Natives can again travel back and forth to Russia's Chukota region without a visa under a decades-old agreement that was recently revived.


Ethics panel clears lawmakers in 2013 Azerbaijan trip

WASHINGTON (AP) ? The House Ethics Committee said Friday it found no evidence of wrongdoing by a bipartisan group of lawmakers who went on a 2013 trip to Azerbaijan paid for by that country's government.


Higher wages a surprising success for Seattle restaurant

In this photo taken Monday, July 27, 2015, Bob Donegan, president of Ivar?s Seafood Restaurants, stands below a Native American artwork in one of the company's restaurants in Seattle. After Seattle's new minimum wage law took effect last April 1, Ivar?s announced that it was jacking up its prices by about 21 percent, eliminating tipping as a routine procedure, and immediately paying all its hourly workers a $15 per hour. They began the new pay rate three years earlier than the law required. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)SEATTLE (AP) ? Menu prices are up 21 percent and you don't have to tip at Ivar's Salmon House on Seattle's Lake Union after the restaurant decided to institute the city's $15-an-hour minimum wage two years ahead of schedule.



Doctor who was father of in vitro fertilization in US dies

FILE- In this May 14, 1998, file photo, Dr. Georgeanna and Dr. Howard Jones, right, pose for a photo in Norfolk, Va. Howard Jones, who pioneered in vitro fertilization in the United States died Friday, July 31, 2015. He was 104. The work of Howard Jones and his late wife, Dr. Georgeanna Jones, at Eastern Virginia Medical School led to the nation?s first child born as a result of in vitro fertilization in 1981. Since then, more than 5 million births have stemmed from in vitro fertilization around the world. (Bill Tiernan/The Virginian-Pilot via AP, File) MAGS OUT; MANDATORY CREDITNORFOLK, Va. (AP) ? Dr. Howard Jones, who pioneered in vitro fertilization in the United States, died Friday at a Virginia hospital surrounded by family.